The Angels’ Share @ The Ross

The Gang in 'Angels Share'

The Gang in ‘Angels Share’

Let’s first deal with definitions: Two percent of the whiskey that evaporates while it distills is called ‘the angels’ share’. You could liken the angels’ share to an offering to the deities for allowing the creation of the spirited drink.

Tasting The Golden Blend

Set in Glasgow, The Angels’ Share is British film director Ken Loach’s film about second chances and the people who give them. Paul Brannigan stars as Robbie, a “wee thug who doesn’t know any better”, who forms an unlikely partnership with his community service pals. In comes Harry, (played lightheartedly by John Henshaw), the delightful supervisor, who, against the rules, takes the motley crew on a field trip on his day off to his “sacred place”, a whiskey distillery. He makes them solemnly swear not to “fight, drink, or rob” while there. A docent informs them of the “subtle reaction between the wood and the spirit” as well as the angels’ share. What follows is an adventure all in the name of whiskey, its taste, its smell, and the artistry in the culture of making a rare and valuable golden blend. The Angels’ Share is a charm, and will leave you feeling, well, … charmed!

The Angels’ Share plays through May 30 at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

The Ross logo

Hear the Friday Live! At the Mill review at 38:59
http://www.netnebraska.org/interactive-multimedia/none/friday-live-lincoln-choral-artists-0

Watch for in-depth Film • Television • & More reviews & commentary.

In the meantime, Catch a film … Share the Popcorn … Feed Your Soul!

Advertisements

Room 237 @ The Ross

Room 237

I don’t get it: Robert Ascher directs a very provocative documentary entitled Room 237. The documentary is a welcomed exercise in close-readings of a film as unseen narrators uncover myriad meanings in Stanley Kubrick’s psychological horror film, The Shining. There are various plausible theories: The Shining is about the slaughter of Native Americans (remember the red & silver ‘Calumet’ baking soda cans in the hotel’s pantry?); The Shining is all about the Holocaust. Well, the number 42 proves it. Remember the year when the Nazi’s initiated the final solution? 1942? Comments by the narrators are in-depth and quite perceptive, and each one carefully investigates the signs and symbols cast about the film, including the number 237. In all, however, Ascher’s project holds tightly to one theory: The Shining is about history and man’s proclivity to create atrocities only to conveniently forget them.

Dick Halloran (Scatman Crothers)

Dick Halloran (Scatman Crothers)

Yet, Room 237 does exactly that: forget, and this oversight is what I don’t get. The glaring omission is an analysis of Dick Halloran, the hotel’s chef in The Shining played by African American entertainer, Scatman Crothers. Why? I have my own ideas but time only permits me to point out that Dick Halloran is the character who is killed by that crazy Jack Torrance when he delivers an ax to his chest. Dick Halloran leaves the wife and son a means to escape from the ‘sins of the father’ after hell has frozen over! No more screaming “Here’s Johnny!” That ending, in and of itself, deserved critique.

Room 237 plays through May 23 at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

The Ross logo

Hear the Friday Live! At the Mill review at the following website @ 36:50:
http://www.netnebraska.org/interactive-multimedia/none/friday-live-lincoln-choral-artists-0

Watch for in-depth Film • Television • & More reviews & commentary.

In the meantime, Catch a film … Share the Popcorn … Feed Your Soul!

%d bloggers like this: