In the Comfort of Joy ~ A Commentary

Screen Shot 2019-07-29 at 12.13.45 PM.png

Got Me back January 17, 2019 when my knee injury happened on the opening night of the show I directed, Who Will Sing for Lena. It was one of the coldest days of the year in Lincoln, Nebraska. For about three years, I had received the call to stop. To just stop. teaching Zumba x3 wk practicing choreo staff meetings teaching lit/film classes x2 wk semesters and summers writing editing performing travel and more travel meetings upon meetings grading papers office hours vocal coaching practice guest singing Stop! Please Stop! All of this, that, and the other–what my father would call ‘rippin’ & runnin’–took me out. I was devastated over the possibility that I may no longer be able to teach my beloved Zumba–this I learned in the emergency room after the outstanding performance at the Haymarket Theater. I wept well into the night. The Goddess, in all of her generosity, hastened Joy to me that next morning. In the comfort of Joy, I saw me. Right there. In that Holy silence.

Watch for film television & more on The Dreher Report.

Advertisements

On Harriet ~ A Commentary

Screen Shot 2019-07-26 at 7.38.17 PMI am excited for what stands to be a most poignant biopic of Harriet Tubman but I hold reservation. The last Harriet Tubman movie I saw, A Woman Called Moses, I felt emasculated the Black men who followed her. The film portrayed them cowering and having to be convinced to embrace freedom.

I love Black men. I do. I think they are the most beautiful and the most courageous creatures on earth. I have/had beautiful beautiful Black men in my family and community to prove it, beginning with Ulysses William Dreher, my father, right on down to the wine-o drinking from the paper bag crouched somewhere over there in the cut.

The portrayal of Black men in A Woman Called Moses broke my heart. Not one historical marker in my ancestral heritage mirrored their onscreen representation. Not one Black male in my community embodied their characterization.

I get it. Freedom-making was an ambitious endeavor; one misstep meant dire consequences. Freedom-making, in addition, challenged inhumane beliefs held by plantation owners and passed down to generations of enslaved people: you and your offspring are nothing but chattel–beasts, wenches, and brutes. 

History tell us, however, that the fervor for freedom took over, and those enslaved who heard the clarion call had no alternative but answer it no matter the consequences. The first step an enslaved person made toward freedom antagonized the plantocracy’s hateful notions circulated about them. That first step initiated psychic healing. 

I hope I see the Black men who dared to believe in Harriet Tubman and join her on the underground railroad portrayed in this manner in Harriet. They haven’t to deserve. It’s theirs!

Watch for Film . Television . & More on The Dreher Report.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: