78/52 Hitchcock’s Shower Scene @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2017-12-17 at 12.05.56 AM.png

I am sure you have a story to tell of the first time you saw Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho. I am sure you have a story to tell of your response to the notorious shower scene in that film. My own experience is that it messed with my sense of safety in private spaces. Hitchcock warned me that no matter how secure is a door’s lock, privacy can be invaded and there would be nothing I could do about it.

Well, Alexandre O. Philippe’s documentary 78/52 Hitchcock’s Shower Scene takes us behind the scenes of Marion Crane’s murder by Mother as she takes a shower before turning in for the evening at the infamous Bates Motel. Philippe has an impressive line-up of talking heads to facilitate the telling of his story: Peter Bogdanovich, Guillermo del Torro, Ilyanna Douglas, Jamie Lee Curtis, Janet Lee’s daughter, and Osgood Perkins, the son of Tony Perkins. Archival footage of Janet Leigh, the star of Psycho, as well as Alfred Hitchcock generates insight on the man behind the curtain.

One striking element to 78/52 is Philippe’s contextualization of the film. Points of reference include the civil rights and women’s liberation movements, the in cold blood murder of the Clutter family in 1959, and how the outbreak of juvenile delinquency cast an exhaustive eye on mothers. Even more important, Philippe notes a tear in the seams of 1950s idealism, in particular the changing roles of women. Something was about to give; it had to, and Philippe delivers a remarkable and incisive analysis of Hitchcock’s move into the space of that breach.

Hitchcock announced to the world of filmmaking: It is time for a change and here it is 78 camera set-ups and 52 cuts later: Psycho, the murder of the movie’s female star early in the film by a cross-dresser. Enter the era of the modern film. Filmmaker Karyn Kusama notes that Marion Crane’s brutal murder is “the first modern expression of the female body under assault”, and Alfred Hitchcock left no stone unturned to render shock to the assault.

Screen Shot 2017-12-17 at 12.13.47 AM

Marli Renfro, Janet Leigh’s body double

As did Hitchcock dismember the body of Marion Crane, so do the interviewees cut apart the shower scene in the film. The shot-by-shot analysis by each of them feeds audience hunger to know more about its composition. Each analysis is remarkable, and this documentary will serve as an informative introduction to film analysis and film review. The attention to detail is astonishing. Did you know that Hitchcock ordered a horde of melons—yes, as in watermelon, honeydew, casaba, crenshaw, cantaloupe–to get the perfect sound of a knife stabbing flesh? The casaba won! Bernard Hermann, the motion picture conductor who composed the unforgettable shrieks, appears in raw footage. Yet, one of the delights in the documentary is the interview with Marli Renfro, Janet Lee’s body double. Now 79 years old, Renfro gently claims her historical significant in playing Lee’s body double. It is a joy to hear her behind-the-scenes story.

The Ross logo

Watch for in-depth Film • Television • & More Reviews & Commentary.

In the meantime,

Catch a film …

Share the Popcorn …

Feed Your Soul!

 

 

Advertisements

Brigsby Bear @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2017-12-17 at 12.26.37 AM

Kyle Mooney as Brigsby Bear (James Pope)

Kidnapped as a baby from the hospital by a two science kooks, James Pope, played by Saturday Night Live regular Kyle Mooney, has lived in isolation underground somewhere USA since then. His parents, Ted, played by Mark Hamil, and April, played by Jane Adams, have assembled an animated outside world where animals and foliage appear real. Installed in the compound are secret codes that open and close doors; they wear gas masks when going outside. James’s only means of entertainment is a television show called the Brigsby Bear Adventures, and new episodes are delivered on VHS tape to him by his parents. Do you remember the 1970s television series called Spectreman and more recent Smallville? Well, add Teletubbies, Barney, and Power Rangers into the mix, hoist the moon from George Milies’s 1902 film Trip to the Moon, and you have Brigsby Bear.

Directed by Dave McCrary and written by Kevin Costello and Mooney, Brigsby Bear is a quirky offbeat film, and it envisions a world of acceptance no matter your circumstance. The FBI locate Ted and April, rescue James, and return him to his birth parents. The adventures begin as James, now 25 years old, finds friends who have an emotional and psychological investment in his project to turn Brigsby Bear into a film. For him, it is his only means of closing out his former world in isolation and embracing his new life.

Costello’s and Mooney’s story really is about using what you have in your own house to create happiness. James has memorized every Brigsby Bear episode, but with his return to his birth family, no more episodes are delivered to him. Since Brigsby Bear’s world is all James has known, Brigsby Bear is the dross material he utilizes to keep him from the brink of insanity. Strangely enough, we can credit James’s steady emotional and psychological course to the advice from his kidnapper father.

The Ross logo

All of Brigsby Bear’s adventures rest inside of James. This element in the story works, and sidesteps our expectation for a complete nervous breakdown by James after his capture and entry into his new life. Mooney is perfect in Brigsby Bear, playing him walking a very fine line between sanity and complete madness.

 

 

My Life as a Zucchini @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2017-03-25 at 9.52.21 PM.png

“No one is coming to your rescue!” an acquaintance said to me once in a strident tone. This, after a personal lament over a situation that I believed held me under a spell. Needless to say, over time that acquaintance and I have uhm … ahem … lost touch, but if we still were in contact, I would gift her with Claude Barras’s film My Life as a Zucchini as soon as it was available on DVD or to stream. I’d scribble a note: Dear Acquaintance, View & Weep! There are those who do come to our rescue!”

Based on the young adult novel by Gilles Paris, My Life as a Zucchini is filmed in stop-motion animation. It is a darling of a film, and Barris breathes life into the poignant stories of round-headed owl-eyed orphaned children living in a group home.

Screen Shot 2017-03-25 at 10.01.51 PM.png

Raymond visits Zucchini

The main character 9-year-old Icare voiced by Erick Abbate, is called Zucchini by his mother. She deals with the abandonment of Zucchini’s father by drinking beer and watching television day in and day out. Zucchini busies himself in the attic building towers with his mother’s beer cans. One day in a drunken rage, his mother climbs the stairs to give the boy the spanking of his life after she hears noises. Then. The accident. Raymond, voiced by Nick Offerman, is a compassionate policeman who processes Icare into the foster care system.

Zucchini’s answers to Raymond’s questions uncover a boy who, in spite of his circumstances, still finds a kernel of something happy. Even though her broken family has depressed his mother, Icare loves her mashed potatoes. Sometimes, he reveals, they even have fun.

Puppeteer Gregory Beaussart and his crew have fashioned a most adorable ensemble of kids, and Barras allows them to grieve, smile & laugh, question, and even fall in love.

We all have heard horror stories about the foster care system but My Life as a Zucchini makes plain that in spite of personal trauma and no matter the chaos, some adults keep their promises; some adults really care; some friends keep watch over us; and, if we find ourselves dangling over the pit of despair, some friends will even come to our rescue.

The Ross logo

My Life as a Zucchini plays through March 30th at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

Also playing through April 6 at the Ross is A Sense of an Ending, Ruh-tesch Batra’s film about reconnecting with a lost love.

Toni Erdmann @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 6.55.33 PM

Meet Toni Erdmann (Peter Simonischek)

The lengths a father will go just to spend time with his daughter are explored in German director Mauren Ade’s film Toni Erdmann. The title of the film is not about a person by the name of Toni Erdmann and all of her or his adventures. Toni Erdmann is an alias. Winfried Conradi, a music teacher with no students, assumes the personality Toni Erdmann with the sole purpose of crashing in on the world of his daughter, Ines. After the death of his dog, Winfried, played by Peter Simonischek, longs to be more present in his daughter’s life. So, he shows up unannounced at her home in Bucharest.

Ines, played by Sandra Hahlur, has no patience for nor the inclination to grant her father’s wishes. She is a young strategist who successfully has climbed the corporate ladder; of course she is busy—always taking calls, going to meetings, giving presentations – sigh – to her father’s disappointment. What is worse she complains to her friends during lunch about how her father’s visit made for the worst weekend. So Winfried, feeling unwelcomed and unappreciated, packs up and returns home–or so Ines thinks.

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 7.12.08 PM

Toni Erdmann in costume

As soon as Ines turns around in a restaurant in the company of her girlfriends or looks around on the rooftop talking to her superior or at her naked-only birthday party, there he is – Toni Erdmann, bumbling around as an ex-con, a style consultant, or a German Ambassador made up with buck teeth and a shabby wig or in a bizarre costume that would scare bigfoot back to its cave. Where will Toni Erdmann appear next?

Peter Simonischek brings Toni Erdmann to a kind of crazy loopy peculiar life, and you can’t get mad at him. Every person in Ines’s life takes to him. Simonischek deftly manages his unpredictable character, and you can’t help but give over your heart to him. In fact, he is a kind of insufferable huggable lovable poppa.

When you see the film Toni Erdmann, be sure to pack a lunch or dinner; it is a long movie—almost 3 hours. And don’t count on a music score to guide your feelings—no—no violins or drum rolls here. Peter Orth, the cinematographer, lingers his camera on people; the camera outwears its welcome at parties and business meetings–even the goodbye between father and daughter is long in the tooth. Ade, however, refuses to pick up the cinematic pace; she makes you wait. The wait is well worth it.

Screen Shot 2017-03-18 at 7.16.27 PM

Erdmann with daughter, Ines

Winfried’s own reflection to his daughter on life uncovers the bright and shining gem in Toni Erdmann. What is worth living in life? Ines asked her father during one of his personality performances. In the backyard of his late mother’s house, father, without costume and daughter with no cellphone come together and alone and without distractions. Winfried finally gets the chance to answer her question. He begins, “The problem is it’s so much about getting things done … you do this or that but in the meanwhile life is just passing by. How are we supposed to The Ross logohang on to moments?  Now I just sit sometimes and remember how you learned to ride your bike. … but you only realize that afterwards … in the moment itself … it’s not possible.”

Toni Erdmann in German with English subtitles.

Jackie @ The Ross

screen-shot-2017-01-11-at-3-32-07-pm

Natalie Portman as Jacqueline Kennedy

Funny thing about death. When it calls for a loved one be it human or pet, grief accompanies the grim reaper. You choose the casket and write the obituary and plan the services and decide on the outfit for the deceased. Everyone acquainted with the family offers their sincerest condolences at the wake. Mailboxes are overstuffed with Hallmark cards or … in today’s technological saturated world, ‘Likes’ and ‘Hearts’, and ‘Teary Man’ are checked on your Facebook page. Then. [sigh] It is all over as the last mound of earth slides from the shovel.

Let me rewind to the planning of funeral services for it is the kernel of Pablo Larrain’s film Jackie, starring Natalie Portman. There is so much to say and feel about the iconic Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. She allowed the world to mourn with her as she exhibited poise during the funeral procession of her slain husband, President John Fitzgerald Kennedy in 1963.

But have you ever wondered, exactly, what went into the fashioning of President Kennedy’s funeral? Was there any resistance to Mrs. Kennedy from the white house? If so, how did she handle it?

 

screen-shot-2017-01-11-at-3-50-10-pm

Jackie with her brother-in-law Robert Kennedy (Peter Sarsgaard)

Let me rewind again: Have you ever thought about the atmosphere aboard Air Force One when Lyndon Johnson is sworn in as the 36th President of the United States as Mrs Johnson and Mrs Kennedy stand-by? Moreover, aside from shock and dismay, how do the people aboard Air Force One and, later, those within the White House react to and interact with Mrs. Kennedy after the national tragedy? Does the new widow keep it together? More to the point, how does the transition take place when the Johnsons move into the White House as Mrs. Kennedy still moves about the national home planning and packing and tending to her children John John and Caroline? Pablo Larrain superbly interprets these intimate occurrences. I have studied Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy right down to the style of shoes and the brand of stockings she wore, and I can tell you this movie gets her. It is obvious – maybe too obvious — that Portman studied each jot and tittle of Mrs. Kennedy’s voice and mannerisms. At times, though, I grew weary of her feathered ‘R’s and the open ‘A’s, spoken like ‘Ah’ in her well-known breathy voice.

Screen Shot 2017-01-11 at 3.46.50 PM.png

Jackie with Pablo Casal (Roland Pidoux)

Larrain remarkably imagines the Kennedy-Johnson transition as one of obvious discomfort and, surprisingly, irritation. Yes. irritation. In Jackie, Larrain plays up the tenuous situation between Mrs. Kennedy, the white house staff, and the Johnsons – the majority of these scenes shot in close and tight spaces. Some want to get on with matters of the state, as does President Johnson’s confidant, Jack Valenti, played by Max Casella. He has no patience for a discussion with the former first lady about her change of funeral plans. Others seem to … tolerate … the First Lady as does Lady Bird Johnson, played by Beth Grant. Stephane Fontaine’s cinematography and Mica Levi’s soundtrack pull together the necessary cinematic accents to amplify each prickly yet sensitive state of affair. Also, the behind the scenes details of private moments whereby public events meticulously are organized evoke sheer honor and respect for place and ceremony.

Yes. There is something about death and what it requires. Pablo Larrain’s Jackie dramatizes the necessity for its closure from the point of view of a former First Lady whose children, John John & Caroline, had to plan their mother’s memorial upon her death in 1994.

 

The Ross logo

Jackie plays through January 26th at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

Also playing at The Ross through January 12 is the French film Things to Come.

Listen to the podcast:

http://netnebraska.org/interactive-multimedia/other/friday-live-extra-jackie

 

 

Little Men @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 10.59.28 PM.png

Tony (Michael Cavelli) and Jake (Theo Taplitz)

One of the hardest things for parents to realize is that some decisions made by them can alter the exterior and, even more important, the interior lives of their children for a lifetime.

Some decisions can be altered given the circumstances; others cannot be helped no matter how many the twist and the turn.

Independent filmmaker Ira Sachs tackles the emotional turmoil of two families whose hearts are torn asunder because of one decision surrounding a piece of property: a brownstone in Brooklyn, New York. His film Little Men, starring Greg Kinnear, Paulina Garcia, and Jennifer Ehle, is a neatly packed drama focusing on the friendship between Jake Jardine and Tony Cavielli, played with remarkable emotional insight respectively by Theo Taplitz and Michael Barbieri. After the death of his grandfather, Jake’s parents Brian (Greg Kinnear) and Kathy (Jennifer Ehle), move into a Brooklyn brownstone willed to them by Brian’s father. Living and working below them is Leonor Cavielli, Tony’s mother, an accomplished entrepreneur who utilizes the space as a sewing center and dress shop. Dire financial circumstances undercut the “new adventure” taken by family Jardine. Kathy has been supporting the family on her income as Brian pushes for a career in theater. To where does Kathy look to augment their income? Leonor’s dress shop.

Screen Shot 2016-11-23 at 11.11.33 PM.png

Brian and Leonor negotiate

While Leonor, Kathy, and Brian go back and forth through some very unpleasant negotiations, the middle schoolers Jake and Tony enjoy the city of Brooklyn and cast day dreams about their hopes and plans for the future. In just a few months, little does Jake know, the choices made by his parents will alter his friendship with Tony beyond repair. What is more, neither he nor Tony will have control no matter the demonstration to the Jardines the emotional impact on these little men.

Sachs is genius in the portrayal of male teenage angst. Within Jake’s and Tony’s innocence, Sachs intersperses a raw critique of the high cost of living in Brooklyn, New York. You know, adult stuff. Through Leonor the desperation to hold on to a home promised to her by the late Elder Jardine who failed to write her into his will is downright soul shattering. Paulina Garcia interprets Leonor’s economic anxiety—if not torment—with such honesty, and you will want to rescue her from these troubles and teach the Jardines a thing or two about compassion.

The Ross logo

 

Watch for Film . Television . & More from The Dreher Report.

In the meantime, watch some TV! Catch a film and share the popcorn! Watch TV! Feed your soul!

 

Only Yesterday @ The Ross

Taeko in the safflower fields

Taeko in the safflower fields

If you are over 5 ft tall and 12 years of age, you may have considered or even taken part in a summer’s activity called detasseling. No frolicking on the the beach or riding the tea cups at Disneyland or touring, say, Universal studios for you. It’s off to a farm in Nebraska or in Iowa to learn the value of work in the cornfields underneath a sweltering July sun!

Meet Taeko, the main character in Academy Award nominated Isao Takahata’s animated film Only Yesterday. Taeko, a 27-year-old unmarried young woman from Tokyo is going on vacation. Rather than a trip abroad, Taeko determines to pick one of humanity’s oldest crops: fields of safflowers. This trek is not the first of her rural adventures; the vacation before, she harvested rice. Despite warnings from friends that she is not getting any younger and needs to settle down, Taeko, packs her bags and travels by train to meet and work with her second family in the countryside.

Taeko w/ Friends (5th grade Taeko upper right)

Taeko w/ Friends (5th grade Taeko upper right)

What is fascinating about Takahata’s Only Yesterday, is the feature of a universal conundrum: how to make peace with the past. Specifically, how to reconcile pain and humiliation that happened to you and that which you caused other people.

Each of us has a desire to reach into the past … to reconstruct it … to look all pretty, neat, and clean. Do not be fooled: The Past? It is a powerful phenomenon, and Takahata strongly suggests some aspects of yesteryear will follow you around as would an abandoned child until you attend to it. In her attention to only yesterday, Taeko contemplates exactly what her fifth-grade self is telling her to do.

Taeko sad over math grades

Taeko sad over math grades

Bring your Kleenex because you will be surprised how Taeko develops her own wings—right there on a colorful safflower farm.

Made 25 years ago in the legendary Studio Ghibli, Only Yesterday is making its film debut here in North America. Daisy Ridley of Star Wars fame voices the adult Taeko and Allison Fernandez dubs Taeko in the 5th-grade.

The Ross logo

Only Yesterday plays through May 5th at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

Also showing through May 5th at the Ross are City of Gold, Hello My Name is Doris, and Miles Ahead.

Miles Ahead @ The Ross

Don Cheadle as Miles Davis

Don Cheadle as Miles Davis

How can yours truly do justice to Miles Ahead, Don Cheadle’s directorial debut in the biopic of the late musician extraordinaire Miles Davis? I honestly do not know if I can pull it off.

Miles Ahead–this film … it is deep; like waaay d e e eeeep; like real down in the ocean deep. The film required two screenings just to get the breadth and scope of Cheadle’s project. He co-wrote and stars in Miles Ahead, and the film is a very rich narrative full of improvisation. If film was jazz, Miles Ahead would be it. Genius. Cheadle handles the iconic Jazz superstar with such care that we see the man—the human being—behind the music. There is no ‘I was born in narrative’; non-existent, too, is the story behind Davis’s interest in his instrument and the genre of Jazz itself.

Ewan McGregor plays Dave Brill, a journalist with Rolling Stone magazine, intent on interviewing Davis in hopes of getting the musician’s comeback story. The film is set in the late 1970s when Miles seemingly has run his course in the Jazz world. He is weary-worn, if not emotionally and artistically spent. He looks unwell and, more significant, out of sync with himself. It is obvious that a facture has occurred between him, his instrument, his music. As a result, he sets himself up in exile in his own Upper West Side apartment. His friend? cocaine, and Dave Brill arranges a drug score from a student drug dealer at Columbia University. A kind of joy ride on the Miles Davis highway of life ensues, as journalist and musician duck & dodge wicked music producers and managers after Cheadle retrieves a tape stolen from his home by one of them.

In all of his darkness, there is love. Davis’s first wife Francis, played with courage and power by Emayatzy Corinealdi, haunts him.

Miles Ahead is a daring project, and Cheadle lands where he wants to be with his subject: a story about a man … an artist who has lost his artistic center but not knowing how to go about finding out what is the matter.

The Ross logo

Miles Ahead plays through May 5th at The Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

Also The Messenger, Su Rynard’s exploration of our deep seated connection to birds, plays through April 28 at The Ross.

Where to Invade Next @ The Ross

 

Screen Shot 2016-03-18 at 5.39.06 PM.png

We are in the midst of some very … how shall I say it … peculiar political times what with the current presidency nearing its end and the political hopefuls who practically are beating us over the head with reasons why they are THE perfect one to fill that post. Is it the best of times? Or the worst? Well, if you are looking for some entertainment to ease your … uhm … pain—to lift you up from news overload, do yourself a favor. Hitch up your horses to your covered wagon and ride on down to the Ross to screen Michael Moore’s newest installation Where to Invade Next. It is a documentary that ponders the thought: How to Make America great again, and, seemingly, the answers cannot be found in our own backyards—or can they?

To answer this question, Moore images that the Joint Chiefs of Staff summon him for advice after realizing that war only led to more war and the creation of subversive forces. Michael narrates, “They hadn’t won a war outright since the big one—WW2 … they felt humiliated, embarrassed … their hands were all placed in a … ahem … no fly zone.” After some thought Moore strongly recommends them to “stand down and give our troops a much deserved break. There are to be no invasions, no more using drones as wedding crashers. Instead of sending in the marines, send in me!”

Screen Shot 2016-03-18 at 5.41.06 PM.png

The No Fly Zone

These places of invasion are Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East, namely, Finland, France, Germany, Iran, Italy, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, and Tunisia. Moore makes known the communal perks that each country affords its citizens, and you will be surprised to know that these benefits find root in none other than in American soil! In his interviews and conversations with residents, we are mesmerized by the amount of leisure and vacation time Italians are given. The month of August – the MONTH of August, the country practically shuts down. In an average year, he discovers, there are usually 30-35 days of paid holiday, that does not include the 12 days of paid national holidays plus 2 hour lunch breaks. Next invasion: Normandy, France in one of the best places to eat in town: the school cafeteria. You’ll have to see the film to believe the menu!

The most poignant invasion is in Iceland. In Iceland, Moore allows the voices of the country’s women to lay out a solution to peace and national caretaking of citizens. As a panel of women critique the notion of rugged individualism that the United States embraces with fervor, this panel prefers the “we” or the group. Former President Vigdis Finnbogadottir, explains, “It is my belief in women … if the world can be saved it will be women who will do that; and they do not do it with war; they do it with words!” These visions come at the end of the documentary. It is a strategic move given these political times. Think about it.

Screen Shot 2016-03-18 at 5.43.04 PM.png

Moore plants flag in the home of an Italian couple

Still in all, Moore reminds audiences that our country once espoused certain ideals and values that catered to the general welfare of the country’s people. The fight for the ERA, he tells us, began 8 years before Iceland elected its first female president. Moore’s trek sadly suggests, however, that the halcyon days of yore have been forgotten or simply dismissed. Where was the love? Right here in the United States. But what happened?

 

Where to Invade Next plays through March 24th at at the Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

 

A War @ The Ross

Screen Shot 2016-03-18 at 4.47.57 PM

“I am tired and sick of war. Its glory is all moonshine. It is only those who have neither fired a shot nor heard the shrieks and groans of the wounded who cry aloud for blood, for vengeance, for desolation. War is hell.”

~ William Tecumseh Sherman

I believe Danish writer-director Tobias Lindholm would agree with Sherman’s observations of war. His drama A War is a case in point of the catch-22s every soldier faces on the frontline of the battlefield. Lindholm masterfully moves through the vein of combat as his camera closes in on the emotions of the soldier and the enemy—people military personnel have been dispatched to kill. A War is an in-depth perspective on the perils of conflict, and the film paints a vivid picture of the moral dilemmas each soldier must grapple with; and the decisions a leader determines are in the best interest of the unit. Lindholm’s A War concludes that no matter the good intent, every decision comes a consequence, and these consequences affect those associated with you. Yes, war is hell.

Company commander Claus M. Pedersen, played by Pillow Asbeek, leads men who are fighting in an Afghan province to protect local farmers and their families from attacks from the Taliban. Back in Denmark, Pedersen’s wife Maria, played by Tuva Novotny, manages the home front with their three small children; the eldest suffers separation anxiety over the absence of his father. Back in Afghanistan, Pedersen and his company have been caught in crossfire, and the commander’s is forced to make a decision for the survival of his unit. Pedersen’s call results in heavy penalties.

As would a surgeon, Lindholm, cuts deep into the body of war to dig out and dig up its complexities and to showcase how warfare affects people and their families on and off the battlefield. There are the usual suspects … you know … guns, armored tanks, landmines, grenades, injury, and death; but through the Pedersen Family … Maria, Claus, and children … Lindholm prompts audiences to be aware that at the end of every piece of artillery used in war, there are human beings, and no matter the rules of engagement, at the end of the day, they are just that: human.

A War plays through March 3 at The Ross Media Arts Center in Lincoln.

The Ross logo

Also opening at The Ross is Son of Saul László Nemesh’s film about a Jewish worker at the Auschwitz concentration camp looking for a rabbi to give a child a proper burial.

What would you do if a someone asked to park her vehicle in your driveway … temporarily but then stayed parked for the next 15 years? Nicholas Hytner’s film Lady in a Van explores that question. Set in London, England, the incomparable Dame Maggie Smith plays Miss Shepard, who describes herself as a “sick woman looking for a last resting place”. She camps out in Alan Bennett’s driveway, first as a favor. Of course, if someone stays over 3 days, a relationship is bound to develop. See what happens.

Lady in a Van and another film 45 Years, continue through March 3 at the Ross.

 

%d bloggers like this: